Codecs, Recording Media, General Infos and Formats

In the following we summarised some Information on Codecs. The summary is by far incomplete, if you have some specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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Codecs and more

HEVC

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is a video compression standard, a successor to H.264/MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding), which was jointly developed by the ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 29/WG 11 Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and ITU-T SG16/Q.6 Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) as ISO/IEC 23008-2 MPEG-H Part 2 and ITU-T H.265. MPEG and VCEG established a Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC) to develop the HEVC standard. Version 1 of HEVC was finalized on January 25, 2013 and the specification was formally ratified as a standard on April 13, 2013.
HEVC is said to double the data compression ratio compared to H.264/MPEG-4 AVC at the same level of video quality. It can alternatively be used to provide substantially improved video quality at the same bit rate. It can support 8K UHD and resolutions up to 8192×4320.
The first version of the standard was completed, approved, and published in 2013. The second version was completed and approved in 2014 and published in early 2015, and includes format range extensions (RExt) (supporting higher bit depths and 4:0:0, 4:2:2, and 4:4:4 chroma sampling formats), scalable coding extensions (SHVC), and multi-view extensions (MV-HEVC).Additional 3D-HEVC extensions for 3D video were completed in early 2015. Further screen content coding (SCC) extensions remain in development for completion in early 2016 for video containing rendered graphics, text, or animation as well as (or instead of) camera-captured video scenes. (Source: Wikipedia)

H.264

H.264/MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding) is a video compression format that is currently one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of video content. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003, and various extensions of its capabilities have been added in subsequent editions. H.264/MPEG-4 AVC is a block-oriented motion-compensation-based video compression standard developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) together with the ISO/IEC JTC1 Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG). The project partnership effort is known as the Joint Video Team (JVT). The ITU-T H.264 standard and the ISO/IEC MPEG-4 AVC standard (formally, ISO/IEC 14496-10 – MPEG-4 Part 10, Advanced Video Coding) are jointly maintained so that they have identical technical content. (Source: Wikipedia)

MPEG-2

MPEG-2 is a standard for "the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information". It describes a combination of lossy video compression and lossy audio data compression methods, which permit storage and transmission of movies using currently available storage media and transmission bandwidth. (Source: Wikipedia)

MPEG-4

MPEG-4 is a method of defining compression of audio and visual (AV) digital data. It was introduced in late 1998 and designated a standard for a group of audio and video coding formats and related technology agreed upon by the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG11) under the formal standard ISO/IEC 14496 – Coding of audio-visual objects. Uses of MPEG-4 include compression of AV data for web (streaming media) and CD distribution, voice (telephone, videophone) and broadcasttelevision applications.

AVC-Intra

AVC-Intra (Advanced Video Codec - Intra Frame Only) is a type of video coding developed by Panasonic, and then supported in products made by other companies. AVC-Intra is available in Panasonic's high definition broadcast products, such as, for example, their P2 card equipped broadcast cameras.
The use of AVC-Intra provides production quality HD video at bit rates more normally associated with electronic news gathering applications, permitting full resolution, 10-bit field capture of high quality HD imagery in one piece camera-recorders.
AVC-Intra was intended for video professionals who have to store HD digital video for editing and archiving. It defines 10-bit intra-frame only compression, which is easy for editing and preserves maximum video quality. The technology significantly outperforms the older HDV (MPEG2 based) and DVCPRO HD (DV based) formats, allowing the codec in certain conditions to maintain better quality in half the storage space of DVCPRO HD. (Source: Wikipedia)

XDCAM

XDCAM is a series of products for digital recording using random access solid-state memory media, introduced by Sony in 2003.
The XDCAM format uses multiple video compression methods and media container formats. Video is recorded with DV, MPEG-2 Part 2 or MPEG-4 compression schemes. DV is used for standard definition video, MPEG-2 is used both for standard and high definition video, while MPEG-4 is used for proxy video. Audio is recorded in uncompressed PCM form for all formats except proxy video, which uses A-Law compression. (Source: Wikipedia)

XDCAM HD

XDCAM HD extends XDCAM to include four 1080-line HD video formats using long-GOP MPEG-2 compression (referred to by Sony as MPEG HD). Also supported is an HD422 format that includes 1920 x 1080 and 1280 x 720 frame dimensions. (Source: documentation.apple.com)

HEVC

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is a video compression standard, a successor to H.264/MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding), which was jointly developed by the ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 29/WG 11 Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and ITU-T SG16/Q.6 Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) as ISO/IEC 23008-2 MPEG-H Part 2 and ITU-T H.265. MPEG and VCEG established a Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC) to develop the HEVC standard. Version 1 of HEVC was finalized on January 25, 2013 and the specification was formally ratified as a standard on April 13, 2013.
HEVC is said to double the data compression ratio compared to H.264/MPEG-4 AVC at the same level of video quality. It can alternatively be used to provide substantially improved video quality at the same bit rate. It can support 8K UHD and resolutions up to 8192×4320.
The first version of the standard was completed, approved, and published in 2013. The second version was completed and approved in 2014 and published in early 2015, and includes format range extensions (RExt) (supporting higher bit depths and 4:0:0, 4:2:2, and 4:4:4 chroma sampling formats), scalable coding extensions (SHVC), and multi-view extensions (MV-HEVC).Additional 3D-HEVC extensions for 3D video were completed in early 2015. Further screen content coding (SCC) extensions remain in development for completion in early 2016 for video containing rendered graphics, text, or animation as well as (or instead of) camera-captured video scenes. (Source: Wikipedia)